What We’re Reading: September 2018

By: Celadon Team

The latest entrant to Netflix’s bumper crop of YA rom-coms and an arresting book on textiles are among the Celadon team’s top book picks this month.

When we’re not poring over manuscript submissions to find the page-turners of the future, we’re digging into our own to-be-read lists. If you’re looking for your next book, try one of our picks—and if you read any of our recommendations, be sure to let us know what you think in the comments below!

This September, team Celadon’s delving into love stories, YA-style, taking deep dives into NYC history, and much more.

Deb Futter
Co-Publisher

Less by Andrew Sean Greer

Less by Andrew Sean Greer is beautifully written and full of pathos. Greer was the winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 2018.”

Reservoir 13 by Jon McGregor

Reservoir 13 by Jon McGregor is also beautifully written and has great pathos.”

Anne Twomey
Creative Director

Pattern by Orla Kiely

Pattern by the Irish textile and fashion designer Orla Kiely. I have a deep love of textiles since I grew up sewing. Her work is more obviously mid-century Scandinavian influenced but she is also inspired by London Mod, fine artists and Japanese culture. A few of her patterns are easily identifiable to the masses but her work is extensive, and this book is stunning and inspiring.”

New York City in 1979 by Kathy Acker

“It’s a short tale of art, sex, blood, junkies, and whores in New York’s underground at the time. I bought it in London last month, because of its “celadon” colored Penguin/Modern packaging, its small transportable size, and the fact that I moved to NYC that same year. At the time, the city had just averted bankruptcy, and artists and other urban pioneers were moving in downtown and renovating lofts and tenements.”

Cecily van Buren-Freedman
Editorial Assistant

There There by Tommy Orange

Orange is one of those rare writers who can turn any sentence into a timeless, exquisite gem. In this novel, he writes about the experiences of urban Native American people living in Oakland and in doing so, adds to the growing chorus of indigenous voices that have long been silenced in American literature. At the moment, I can’t get enough of books that toe the line between novels and short fiction (Jenny Zhang’s Sour Heart and Nafissa Thompson-Spires’ Heads of the Colored People are also notable), and the way this book blends those genres is heartbreakingly effective.

To All the Boys I've Loved Before by Jenny Han

“I’m a sucker for a good rom-com. Luckily for me, Netflix is doing its best to revive them, with this being the cream of the crop (and making important waves for the representation of Asian-Americans in rom-coms)! After watching the movie twice in one night, I immediately ordered the entire boxed set and don’t know how I’m going to make it the entire month until it’s back in stock.

Alexis Neuville
Marketing & Publicity Assistant

Vengeful by V.E. Schwab

“One of my most anticipated novels of 2018, and coming out late September. Highly anticipated sequel to VE Schwab’s adult novel, Vicious. Fans of X-Men would absolutely love this. The superhero craze is at a high point, and this novel is right alongside that, with great villains.

Darius the Great is Not Okay by Adib Khorram

A debut novel that was one of five books featured on the Young Adult Buzz Panel at BEA 2018. A great story about a teenage boy struggling with his depression and finding himself on a family trip to visit his grandparents in Iran. Star Trek fans (lots of references to the show!) and fans of Becky Albertalli will love this. It’s somewhat like Perks of Being a Wallflower set in Iran.

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